08: Conformity, Compromise, and Crisis – Teaching Plan
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Key Thought: Compromise between our own inclinations and God’s direction can lead to false worship, but we are to call and be called to repentance, obedience, and worship of the one true God.

1. Have a volunteer read I Kings 11:1-4.

A. Ask class members to share a short thought on what the main idea of this text is.

B. What harm is there in having romantic interaction with others who are not committed members of the SDA church?

C. Personal Application: Has having a relationship with a non-SDA ever brought you to doubt or question your faith and worship practices? Share.

D. Case Study: One of your relatives states, “I think it is a good idea to visit other churches on Sunday and worship with them. Maybe we can be a good example for them as we mingle in their churches.” How would you respond to your relative?

2. Have a volunteer read I Kings 12:25-28.

A. Ask class members to share a short thought on what the main idea of this text is.

B. Jesus told the woman at the well that she didn’t know what she worshipped on the mountain, for salvation was of the Jews. Can we substitute time or place in our worship of God? Share.

C. Personal Application: What do people use in their lives that may be a substitute for true worship?

D. Case Study: One of your friends states, “I don’t have to go to church to worship God. I can stay at home and watch 3ABN, or worship God in nature: camping, hiking, swimming, or just walking. God is everywhere. God is in nature. I don’t need to be in a building.” How would you respond to your friend?

3. Have a volunteer read I Kings 18:17-21.

A. Ask class members to share a short thought on what the main idea of this text is.

B. What were some of the characteristics of those who were worshipping Baal? What kind of worship did Elijah exhibit?

C. Personal Application: Do you think that worship has been “compromised” too much? Do you think those who look at worship as solemn, quiet, and sacred are too conservative? Share your thoughts.

D. Case Study: One of your neighbors states, “How do we know what true worship is supposed to be like? Each culture, each personality, each group of worshippers may have a different way of worshipping God. None are wrong, only different.” How would you respond to your neighbor?

4. Have a volunteer read Malachi 3:16-18.

A. Ask class members to share a short thought on what the main idea of this text is.

B. How does fearing the Lord show that people are thinking on His name and truly worshipping Him?

C. Personal Application: Are we to be meek and humble all the time, or are we to be praiseworthy, bold, and confident in the Lord? Share your thoughts.

D. Case Study : Think of one person who needs to hear a message from this week’s lesson. Tell the class what you plan to do this week to share with them.

(Note: “Truth that is not lived, that is not imparted, loses its life-giving power, its healing virtue. Its blessings can be retained only as it is shared.” MH p. 149)

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08: Conformity, Compromise, and Crisis – Teaching Plan — 3 Comments

  1. My comment is on the case study of #3.
    I have a sister that is basically just like the neighbor. She is very inclusive in her thinking and leaves out nothing. To her there are no absolutes, no truth, no right or wrong, and every path leads to bliss.
    If you confront her on these issues she simply shuts you out, turns around and walks away. She can not be reasoned with and will not entertain anything other than what she wants to think about.
    To me this whole thing is like it was in the time of the judges, "everyone did what was right in his own eyes" (Judges 17:6 NKJ).

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    • I understand your situation. Only the Holy Spirit can impress her because she has already made her mind. Now, there are things you can do, keep praying for her and you can also fast. Fasting by itself won't do anything but your thoughts and special prayer for her can do much more. There is one more thing, you can ask people that you trust to pray for her too. Now last but not least, review your spiritual life, sometimes it is our faults that keep God's power from manifesting itself. I hope this advice may be of help to you and your sister.

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  2. I wish to comment on the Personal Application of #4. Are we to be meek and humble all the time? Well, true meekness and humility are obviously so essential to the fear of God that one could hardly contemplate a time or place where we could very well dispense with them. So, does this necessarily preclude praise, boldness, or confidence in the Lord?

    Let's not confuse outward diffidence or a yielding disposition with true meekness and humility. Nor let us judge one another when we don't think we are seeing the kind of meekness and humility that we suppose others ought to exhibit. We are not all the same, nor should we be.

    True meekness and humility are an inward quality that we should all prize. If our praise, our boldness, and our confidence are truly in the Lord, I believe that they will be consistent with those precious inward qualities.

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