09: Discipling the Powerful – Lesson Plan
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Key Thought : The wealthy, world-loving souls can be drawn to Christ, but they are the most difficult to access.gless09

[Lesson plan for Discipling the Powerful February 24, 2014]

1. Have a volunteer read Romans 13:1-7.

a. Ask class members to share a thought on what the most important point in this text is.
b. Why should the Christian submit himself, or herself, to governments, police, or bosses on the job if they are not being honest, fair, or nice? Share your thoughts.
c. Personal Application: Is civil disobedience or demonstrations or encouraging disrespect for authority ever acceptable for Christians? Share your thoughts.
d. Case Study: One of your relatives states: “The government is illegitimate. I refuse to pay taxes. They misuse tax money, they are a corrupt system, and I refuse to give them my money. Christians shouldn’t submit themselves to a similar government.” How would you respond to your relative?

2. Have a volunteer read Matthew 12:8-16.

a. Ask class members to share a short thought on what the most important point is in this passage.
b. Why were the authorities so bent on destroying Christ? Why was He still trying to reach out to them and reason with them?
c. Personal Application: Are you an “up-front” kind of person, or a “behind the scenes” kind of person? Does it matter? Share your thoughts.
d. Case Study: One of your neighbors states, “What do you Adventists believe anyway? Give me three main teachings that your church has.” How would you respond to your neighbor?

3. Have a volunteer read Matthew 8:5-10.

a. Ask class members to share a short thought on what the main idea of this text is.
b. Share an example of the church showing your accountability to the public or congregation in leadership.
c. Personal Application: What kind of impression do you want to have with those you interact with concerning your Christian witness? Share your thoughts.
d. Case Study: One of your friends states, “You can’t witness to rich and powerful people unless you already know them well, because they don’t know who to trust or believe without thinking you have an alternative motive for approaching them. They would never listen to you in the first place.” How would you respond to your friend?

4. Have a volunteer read Luke 23:1-7.

a. Ask class members to share a short thought on what the main idea of this text is.
b. What would you consider success in being before the influential in your community?
c. Personal Application: What are you and your church known for in your community? Does it give you an influence on the leaders in your area? Share your thoughts.
d. Case Study: Think of one person who needs to hear a message from this week’s lesson. Tell the class what you plan to do this week to share with them.

(Note : “Truth that is not lived, that is not imparted, loses its life-giving power, its healing virtue. Its blessings can be retained only as it is shared.” MH p. 149.

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09: Discipling the Powerful – Lesson Plan — 1 Comment

  1. [Moderator's Note: Please use full names when commenting. Comments without full names may not be published. Thank you.]

    Did not Hitler have the local priests and ministers to urge a reading of Romans 13 and insist on obedience to him self and his regime? Did not the Roman Church support Hitler? Did not Hitler use the priesthood and minister to support his agenda?
    Did not F. D. Roosevelt issue a executive order to all to turn in their gold
    coins and if they did not they could be fined $10,000 and be in prison for a number of years? Did all people obey that? NO! There were many who hid their gold and when the ban was lifted had it and used it! So question. If the Federal Government breaks the Constitution, makes orders and regulations contrary to the document they SWORE to uphold then are the people legally to disobey that ruling, executive order? Supreme Court decision: "Where rights are secured by the Constitution are involved, there can be no rule making or legislation which would abrogate them." Miranda vs Arizona 384 US 436, 491. "The claim and exercise of a constitutional right cannot be converted into a crime." Miller vs US 230 F 486, at 489.

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