Sabbath School Net » http://ssnet.org Seventh-day Adventist Bible Study Discussion Mon, 31 Aug 2015 12:37:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Monday: Waiting on Tables http://ssnet.org/blog/monday-waiting-on-tables/ http://ssnet.org/blog/monday-waiting-on-tables/#comments Sun, 30 Aug 2015 14:00:00 +0000 http://ssnet.org/?p=48775 See more posts by Sabbath School Lesson

Read Acts 2:44-47, Acts 4:34-37. What kind of picture of the early church is presented here? No question, things were for a time going quite well among the early believers. Of course, everyone is fallen, and before long some tensions started to rise. Read Acts 6:1-7. What problems arose, and how did the church deal … [Click to read more ...]

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Read Acts 2:44-47, Acts 4:34-37. What kind of picture of the early church is presented here?

No question, things were for a time going quite well among the early believers. Of course, everyone is fallen, and before long some tensions started to rise.

Read Acts 6:1-7. What problems arose, and how did the church deal with those problems?

People Sharing a Meal

Image © Rolf Jansson from GoodSalt.com

Rapid growth of the Jerusalem church brought with it social tension. Philip was appointed to a team to deal with it. Converts included underprivileged and economically challenged persons whose participation in the daily common meals placed increasing demands on church leaders. A murmuring about unfair distribution of food to Greek-speaking widows emerged. This was especially sensitive because of reminders by the Hebrew prophets not to neglect widows and orphans.

To resolve this serious issue, all 12 apostles gathered the believers and proposed the appointment of seven men, full of the Holy Spirit and wisdom, who would literally deaconize (Greek for serve) tables so the 12 could deaconize the Word (see Acts 6:3-4). All seven had Greek names, perhaps indicating a balancing of welfare service for the neglected Greek-speaking widows. Among them was Philip, the first time that this Philip is mentioned in the Bible.

The apostles argued that additional leadership was needed so that they should not be overworked by the administration of the resources necessary for communal life. They emphasized that their call was to devote themselves to the Word of God and to prayer.

What are some of the potentially divisive issues in your own local church, and how can you allow God to use you to help ease them?

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8 comment(s) for this post:

  1. Johnny Coker:
    30 Aug 2015 To me, the underlining problem was not just to remember to take care of widows and orphans but that there was murmuring going on which is a tool used by the Devil to cause disharmony. There was an atmosphere of jealousy, prejudice and favoritism going on which is a problem still with the church today.
  2. Daniel Chidinma:
    30 Aug 2015 SDA We call a remnant church and we need to be courteous.some members are not following apostleship rather practices of diverse religions as in SOP&VOP. Leaders of the church should(pray and fast with such people revealing what God demands and does.) take time with members who claim VOP&SOP for they are evil attraction which proves that God is not present where as the versa. #penticostal should not be used for such churches,knowing what happened on penticost.
  3. Hugh Dalhouse:
    30 Aug 2015 Given the nature of the current pervasive values and attitudes of the church it appears very unlikely that Christians will reproduce the piety of the early church. Though a hard act to follow the pattern of oneness and common sharing of the New Testament believers presents a picture of primitive godliness needful but lacking today (Acts 2:44-47; Acts 4:34-37). Imagine a church condition in which it can truly be said, “Nor was there anyone among them who lacked;” (Acts 4:34) Notwithstanding desperate needs in the present generation many are quick to justify holding onto riches, especially if obtained by hard work or some form of faithfulness to God, and therefore deserved in the mind of the one blessed. Of course the faithfulness which has gain as its goal is not that which tends to Christlikeness. Interestingly Nicodemus who is often cited as a rich believer surrendered his wealth as he surrendered to God and became poor in this world’s goods. His treasure storehouse was shifted to Heaven (Matthew 6:19-21) and he remained faithful. Though a foreign concept to some, particularly in more developed regions of the world, the ‘having all things common’ experience and simplicity of living is closer to life in heaven than anything else on display in this world (Acts 4:44, 46). While the exact structure of the early church may not be duplicated a revival of such principles is only to be expected with another refreshing shower of the Spirit, and only among those who are stirred by the outpouring. With the temporal issues out of the way the early believers could give greater attention to building up the kingdom of God “and the Lord added to the church daily those who were being saved.” (Acts 2:47) Could the Lord repeat the experience soon? “It is almost time for the Lord to come.”
  4. kemchau [surname?]:
    31 Aug 2015 This lesson shows how important the arm of welfare is. The least fortunate must be helped. Pastors are already overworked and cannot attend to everything. As a church we must continue to help the less fortunate among us because it is of vital importance. Imagine they picked people FULL of the spirit for welfare work, not just anyone. May we all remember to give.
  5. George Nyankson:
    31 Aug 2015 Is very amazing that the spirit of God is moving our Church t the vary doctrines of truth through our Leaders!!Let's praise him! In our church today,favoritism and whom i know for long has been the order of the day disregarding the inner qualities that the newly members have,
  6. scott kirkham:
    31 Aug 2015 being in need. It is not a wonderful thing. Begging the body of Christ is not a light thing. And good stewardship in a time some only come to church for an opportunity to beg makes charity work difficult. As Barb and I age and out needs have increased. I look arround and realize we eat, and live in our home and drive out car. Wait. Entirely because of charity. Barb works and I do when work presents itself. There is a class of humanity I belong to. Like gipsies in europe. I went to jail and I am the one who had a job at DHL airport and DHL almost lost government contract. and some ex felons make it harder on us by workplace violence. I am branded and labeled and set on the curb. When I apply for work the response is your to old and Never here.
  7. Charmaine M [Full Name Please]:
    31 Aug 2015 What i learn this morning? is that we as Christian today must learn from the early church. We must let history repeat it self. We must be in one accord by praying daily for the holy spirit to guide us in remembering needy persons in our church today.remember we are human and we need the holy spirit guidance. If you notice Paul ask them to PRAY and choose leaders who are powered by holy spirit, who are wise in welfare of the needy in the church today. God love a cheerful giver.
  8. Camila Meyer:
    31 Aug 2015 I dont see it as a favoritism but instead the church was just starting to reach the Gentiles and they were in a process of spreading the Word of God and it wasn't easy, they were busy and unexperienced. God was guiding them and they figured out that the body of Christ as a whole can do different things for the growth of the church. And they did!

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Sunday: Philip the Evangelist http://ssnet.org/blog/sunday-philip-evangelist/ http://ssnet.org/blog/sunday-philip-evangelist/#comments Sat, 29 Aug 2015 14:00:38 +0000 http://ssnet.org/?p=48758 See more posts by Sabbath School Lesson

While we do not look at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen. For the things which are seen are temporary, but the things which are not seen are eternal (2 Cor. 4:18, NKJV). Think about what Paul is saying here, especially as we study this week about Philip … [Click to read more ...]

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While we do not look at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen. For the things which are seen are temporary, but the things which are not seen are eternal (2 Cor. 4:18, NKJV). Think about what Paul is saying here, especially as we study this week about Philip the evangelist, someone of whom we know little except for the few references in the Bible.

Persecution of Christians

Image © Pacific Press from GoodSalt.com

As we will see, though, Philip did a good work even though most of what he accomplished we know little about. Who are some people whom you know of who have done great things for God but with little outward recognition? Why is it always important to keep the principle of Paul’s words in mind, especially if we do a work that doesn’t garner much acclaim or attention? See also 1 Cor. 4:13.

Philip was a popular Greek name that means horse lover. In the New Testament there are four persons called by that name. Two had the additional name Herod and were part of the Herodian ruling family, which exerted a generally harsh rule over Israel in New Testament times. The remaining Philips had outstanding roles in mission.

The first, Philip of Bethsaida, was a disciple who was instrumental in bringing Nathanael to Jesus (John 1:43-46). Later he brought Greeks to Jesus (John 12:20-21).

The second Philip was designated the evangelist in Acts 21:8 to distinguish him from Philip the disciple. He first appeared in the Jerusalem church as a table waiter (Acts 6:2-5) who turned evangelist and missionary (Acts 8:12). His missionary service, extending over twenty years and supplemented by his four prophesying daughters, is mentioned in Acts. We know little else of his background.

It was Philip who preached the gospel to the Samaritans; it was Philip who had the courage to baptize the Ethiopian eunuch. For a time the history of these two workers (Philip and Paul) had been closely intertwined. It was the violent persecution of Saul the Pharisee that had scattered the church at Jerusalem, and destroyed the effectiveness of the organization of the seven deacons. The flight from Jerusalem had led Philip to change his manner of labor, and resulted in his pursuing the same calling to which Paul gave his life. Precious hours were these that Paul and Philip spent in each other’s society; thrilling were the memories that they recalled of the days when the light which had shone upon the face of Stephen upturned to Heaven as he suffered martyrdom flashed in its glory upon Saul the persecutor, bringing him, a helpless suppliant, to the feet of Jesus.—Ellen G. White, Sketches From the Life of Paul, p. 204.

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7 comment(s) for this post:

  1. Hugh Dalhouse:
    29 Aug 2015 There is a widespread feeling that people deserve recognition for the “great things” they do for God. So who should render this recognition? Credit means a lot to this generation. It also did to many during Christ’s earthly sojourn (John 5:44; John 7:18; John 12:43). Philip, however, did not need greater recognition. Anything men may do for the Lord is paltry when placed alongside what the Savior has done. It is an act of grace when Jehovah honors the faithful for anything they do. On the other hand the Redeemer is entitled to absolute recognition from all. By stating that no human is greater than John, but the least in the kingdom of God is greater than John, Jesus effectively indicated there are no great men and lesser men in the Father’s eyes (Luke 7:28). The lavish praise of men and women is an idea encouraged by Satan to promote pride and create human idols to divert glory from God. Those who supposedly do great things from a human perspective have only been placed in designed circumstances and used by the Holy Spirit to advance the will of God. The life, health and abilities they possessed were only lent to them. If any credit is due it is that they allowed God to use them. The same applies to the unknown whom God uses in less spectacular ways. The faithful soon understand that they have no claim to greatness, but are just the beneficiaries of great privileges. They are not dependent on the affirmation or commendations of others, but the approval of God. They follow the prescription of Jesus and hide behind the cross lest they become overexposed and take some or all of the glory belonging to the Omnipotent One (Matthew 6:1-4).
  2. Robert Whiteman:
    29 Aug 2015 Sad how few understand this. Mere men are treated as if gods while their Maker who gives every breath is often forgotten and lost sight of.
  3. Nimrod Chitsiga:
    29 Aug 2015 Philip had the unction of the Holy Spirit.(Acts 6v3,8v5-7).He learned from Christ(Mathew 11v29).Christ Himself when He had done great things could command His disciples not to tell people(Mathew 17v9).Then therefore those who are under the influence of the Holy Spirit humble themselves and seek no human honour but seek to please the one who has called them out of darkness unto His marvelous light.See also Galatians 5v16,22-26.
  4. aditor [surname?]:
    30 Aug 2015 Its so easy to look down th work tht you I doing for th Lord because maybe noone is noticing or thr no numbers to show yo fruits.but wat I. Hve leant on Sunday is even though Philip wasn't mentioned so much he did his work faithfully n thus wat God is looking for in us .
  5. Aca Vatanimoto Tuisamoa:
    30 Aug 2015 It is always human nature to admire at things done publicly including evangelism with praise for they feed the ego and the Devil is happy by them while we do not wish to acknowledge things done secretly especially by those lowly (in the sense of our own criteria of ranking people and things). One of the character that always fascinated me was Daniel and the 3 Heroes who were not sanctuary or priesthood workers but who stood tall among the Heathens and I presume and suspect were not famous among the Jews nor known back in Israel but as SOP stated most of the Babylonians during Daniel's witness will be in Heaven. How rightly so are our human perceptions are and praise God He is not human for His thoughts and ways of recognizing things and ranking things is far way different from ours as far as the heavens from the earth. So I suppose we will have a lot of surprises not only in Heaven but here on Earth as the Lord Jesus descends from Heaven and await us on the clouds and to our surprise some of those that we highly esteem here on earth for their public work as evangelists, bible workers, medical missionaries et al won't be nowhere to be seen but those unknown unsung heroes here on earth are everywhere to be seen caught up to the clouds with the Lord for the final journey to the Kingdom of Heaven. The question begs to be asked is this, are you busy with the Lords work and all its fame and glory for ego's sakde among the saints in your local church, conference et al that you don't have time for the Lord of the Work with humility and meekness? Are you so caught up with the gift of the Spirit that you have forgotten the fruit of the Spirit of patience and humility? After all in Matthew 7 closing chapter we hear the Master of the Work clearly denouncing the spiritual gifts fanatics who have ignored the fruits of the Spirit while He acknowledges those who humbly obey the Lord of the Work and are humbled by His call and work but producing the fruit of the Spirit. Who are you the gift fanatics or the fruit bearers?
  6. scott kirkham:
    30 Aug 2015 Hebrews 11:32 to the end. Speaks of the many prophets and saint who actually suffered for the belief in Resurection which seems to be the Gospel. And Hebrews goes on to declare that neither they nor we have seen that promise. So we wait for a promised resurection No one has seen. The men of Faith listed in Hebrews 11 saw not the promise. Abraham saw no nations. Etc moses received not the promise land. In Faith we all wait and declare the promise.
  7. O.Clayton Reid:
    31 Aug 2015 We often hear about how humble and Christ-like certain of our leaders are and when compare ourselves to these great men a feeling of humility sometimes follows, but is this enough? The truth is, none of these mere men perfectly portray the Image of God we were created in, all these have sinned and do fall short of the glory of God as “All of our righteousness is as filthy rags”, yet the Bible says of all believers, “You are the light of the world, the salt of the earth, … Can a city set upon a hill be hid?.” Where do these seemingly opposite perspectives meet? I say that people who give 100% to everything they do know commonly where these two ideas come together. And it is not only Christians who understand God’s nature. There is a clear sign at the front of our local crossfit gym, it reads, "leave the ego at the door." It is because by nature these men understand the way to real progress, it is through humility. I come to the gym not because I am strong but because I am weak, not to brag about how many pull ups I can do or to finish in from of others I am competing with, I come there to be able to perform my physical job the best that I possibly can even into my senior years. I also come to inspire others to do the same and every good athlete’s understanding is that as we apply ourselves to the task of building a strong body we discover very specific weaknesses which when understood, we work on those things which need the more care and attention. Going to the gym and doing only one exercise, “which I do well” while ignoring the balance of those things which are required for a healthy strong body always ends in injury and is frankly a bad example for others to follow. It is true in fitness, it is true in business and it better be true in the lives of professing Christians. The only people who do not know this are those who never apply themselves 100 percent to doing anything. Will the followers of Christ do less than the world around us? We are loved by God and we are called to love God with all our hearts and minds and strength, to do anything less is feeble and unholy. I wasn’t born Christ-like, some fortunate one’s were born with the more amiable dispositions, but anyone who applies themselves 100% will discover their weaknesses and if they are humble they will brag of these things more than their natural gifts. Don’t be fooled, it takes real work to really be like Jesus and even with that our performance never even remotely matches the attitude of God in the cross of Jesus Christ. Good health and God speed to you all.

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Sabbath: Philip as Missionary http://ssnet.org/blog/sabbath-philip-as-missionary/ http://ssnet.org/blog/sabbath-philip-as-missionary/#comments Fri, 28 Aug 2015 14:00:24 +0000 http://ssnet.org/?p=48753 See more posts by Sabbath School Lesson

Read for This Week’s Study: 2 Cor. 4:18, Acts 2:44-47, Acts 4:34-37, Acts 6:1-7, Acts 8, Acts 21:7-10. Memory Text: But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit comes on you; and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth (Acts 1:8 NIV). … [Click to read more ...]

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Read for This Week’s Study: 2 Cor. 4:18, Acts 2:44-47, Acts 4:34-37, Acts 6:1-7, Acts 8, Acts 21:7-10.

Memory Text: But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit comes on you; and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth (Acts 1:8 NIV).

World mission was the main concern of the risen Christ during the 40 days between His crucifixion and ascension.

Image © Lars Justinen Goosalt.com

Image © Lars Justinen Goosalt.com

The New Testament preserves at least five of His Great Commission statements: Matthew 28:18-20, Mark 16:15, Luke 24:47-49, John 20:21, Acts 1:5-8. Together they constitute the greatest assignment ever given to Christians. Among the commands was a geographical strategy for mission outreach, from its Jerusalem base to all Judea and Samaria, then ultimately to the ends of the earth. This was a command that they, indeed, took seriously and set out to fulfill.

This geographical strategy is prominent in the mission work of Philip the evangelist. According to Acts 8, his work extended outward from Jerusalem in expanding circles. That is, it kept spreading farther and farther as time progressed.

Who was this Philip the evangelist? What does the Word of God tell us about him and the work that he did during the earliest days of the church? Finally, what lessons can we take away for ourselves from the inspired record of this early missionary?

Study this week’s lesson to prepare for Sabbath, September 5.

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2 comment(s) for this post:

  1. Hugh Dalhouse:
    29 Aug 2015 The apostles, including Philip and the disciples in general of the early church had much in common, including persecution (2 Timothy 3:12). Jesus had told them before (Matthew 10:16 - 36) and so they were prepared. They understood beforehand they would need courage from the Holy Spirit and they prayed for it (Acts 4:29; Ephesians 6:19). Persecution in part actually helped to spread the work and Philip took the message to Samaria, a place where there was no persecution initially. Those who are commissioned with the task of taking the final warning message to the world ought to understand they too will need courage. It becomes the remnant people to pray for boldness if they are to preach undiluted truth; for they will be faced with stiff opposition, even within families and the household of faith (Luke 12:51-53). While there are those who will be content to just say peace, peace (Jeremiah 6:14; 1 Thessalonians 5:3) the saints are given a strong message for good reason and ought not to shrink from it to gain favor or applause. The faithful will face real and fake charges through various agents instigated by the accuser of the brethren (Revelation 12:10). If we cannot deal with light opposition (Jeremiah 12:5) there is little reason to believe we will stand in the final great test (Revelation 13:16). Like Philip the faithful seek out the receptive (Matthew 10:14), but when confronted take courage and endure the preparation in whatever for it comes. As long as the Lord has work for any He will send angels to shield and strengthen. And when the work is done He has something better in store (Hebrews 11:40).
  2. Raul Morena:
    30 Aug 2015 Christ gave us an example and what he did became our road map and a manual for winning souls.The apostles followed Christ's example. Then everything fall on its proper places. The key to success is prayerful life and walking through his footprints. Our lives, dedicated to His work is the powerful light that can turn vilest offender submit themselves to that light.

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Is Book Knowledge All You Need? http://ssnet.org/blog/book-knowledge-need/ http://ssnet.org/blog/book-knowledge-need/#comments Thu, 27 Aug 2015 16:28:36 +0000 http://ssnet.org/?p=48828 See more posts by William Earnhardt

While living in Texas, near Southwestern Adventist University I was good friends with a theology student and his wife. They just had a new baby when I called one evening. The husband was quick to get off the phone with me. I thought nothing of it, but apparently he thought he owed me an explanation when he called … [Click to read more ...]

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While living in Texas, near Southwestern Adventist University I was good friends with a theology student and his wife. They just had a new baby when I called one evening. The husband was quick to get off the phone with me. I thought nothing of it, but apparently he thought he owed me an explanation when he called back the next night.

He explained he had an argument with his wife when I called. His wife was trying to breastfeed but wasn’t succeeding and was becoming frustrated. He then started instructing her how to breastfeed, and she became very angry at him. I asked him, “How in the world can you tell your wife how to breastfeed?” His answer was the classic example of how some people overestimate book knowledge when he very authoritatively responded, “I read it in a book!”

GoodSalt.com-kibas0382

GoodSalt.com-kibas0382

There are some things you just can’t learn in a book. A book might make you smart, but it can’t make you compassionate, understanding and caring, and those are very important traits in a Christian missionary.

Around the same time, I talked to another theology student who was telling me how wise his grandfather was but then lowered his head in disappointment and said, “but he never got a degree, so all of his knowledge was wasted.”

Degree or no degree, knowledge is never wasted. Too many confuse a degree with an education. There are actually many people who are educated through personal studies and practical experience who do not have degrees, and there are people with degrees who have no practical knowledge. And, of course, there are plenty of people with both practical and theoretical knowledge. Those are the best!

It has been many years since that night I called my friend in Texas. He has gone on to become a wonderful pastor and an even more gracious, caring and understanding husband and father. He has learned some great things from books, but it has taken more than books for him to learn to be caring, compassionate and understanding. It takes experience. It takes time alone with God in prayer as well as reading the Good Book.

When I am encouraging a Bible student who is discouraged with doubt and disappointments, they will listen a little as I quote Bible promises, but they really become attentive, when I tell them how I have applied those verses in my life when I too have been disappointed and discouraged.

I can easily understand why my friend’s wife got so frustrated with him when he was trying to instruct her because of what he had read in a book. Book knowledge is great, but it is pretty useless unless you yourself have put it into practice and succeeded. And I seriously doubt my friend ever put that book knowledge on breastfeeding into practice! Therefore with all the book knowledge in the world, he had no right instructing his wife how to nurse their baby. Likewise, unless we are putting Bible teaching into practice we cannot expect others to listen to us.

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9 comment(s) for this post:

  1. Robert Mong'are:
    27 Aug 2015 thank you
  2. LINDA MACHIE:
    27 Aug 2015 Truth! I realise that it has no meaning to me when I go through a rough patch and someone only says " I will pray for you" or "the bible says" but I get encouragement and strength when someone says "I once got into a situation like this and I saw God's hand when He did this or that" To know that the God I trust has been trustworthy in the time of troubles of other people means He will come through for me too.
  3. Daniel Musyoka:
    27 Aug 2015 Life is not all about books, there are many situations that require wisdom from God and not book knowledge.
  4. Shirley de Beer:
    28 Aug 2015 So true William, you hit the nail on the head, Jesus first showed people he cared about them then he shared the truth. Even then he mostly spoke in parables because it was easier to remember. Even after we have shown people the love of Jesus we need to remember that people learn best in different ways, some are verbal, others visual, others manual. Myself I love to read and would rather read than listen to a sermon or a testimony, so bring on the books!
  5. tendai chanda:
    28 Aug 2015 But the extreme is dangerous also. Book knowledge could be a valuable starting point with absolutely no experience. There is no man who will then be able to comment on breastfeeding. Maybe the issue was technique as opposed to not having experience.
  6. kondwani kufeyani:
    28 Aug 2015 Wow nice example
  7. joseph jefferson:
    29 Aug 2015 Your article is write/right on. Formal knowledge is formal knowledge. Biblical Knowledge is Biblical knowledge. Too much formal knowledge can sometimes make us arrogant. Biblical knowledge was designed to make us wiser. Something that was never tackled as an issue, but is and should be an inclusionary part of this article, is that of EXPERIENCE. There are experiences that come about because of things that have been learned, and there are inherent experiences (experiences that JESUS has naturally placed in our lives). The inherent act and experience of breastfeeding belongs to a woman and a woman only. However, the major point that I believe you are trying to make, hits home. Not everything can be learned from a secular book.
  8. joseph jefferson:
    29 Aug 2015 Too little knowledge sometimes = ignorance Too much knowledge sometimes = arrogance
  9. William Earnhardt:
    29 Aug 2015 Right Joseph. We don't want to be ignorant or arrogant. As we studied in Proverbs earlier this year, wisdom and humility are beautiful together. Arrogance and stupidity not so much. Thank you all for your thoughtful comments.

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Peter and the Gentiles – Teaching Plan http://ssnet.org/blog/peter-and-the-gentiles/ http://ssnet.org/blog/peter-and-the-gentiles/#comments Thu, 27 Aug 2015 16:26:02 +0000 http://ssnet.org/?p=48446 See more posts by Michael Fracker

Lesson for August 22-28, 2015 Key Thought : Peter made many mistakes, but his teachable attitude and openness to God’s leading in his life is a lesson for us today. 1. Have a volunteer read Acts 2:14-18. a. Ask class members to share a thought on what the most important point in this text is. … [Click to read more ...]

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Lesson for August 22-28, 2015

Key Thought : Peter made many mistakes, but his teachable attitude and openness to God’s leading in his life is a lesson for us today.

1. Have a volunteer read Acts 2:14-18.

Image © Lars Justinen Goosalt.com

Image © Lars Justinen Goosalt.com

a. Ask class members to share a thought on what the most important point in this text is.
b. What is the only purpose for the gift of tongues? Are we to expect to see this gift manifested today?
c. Personal Application : Have you ever experienced or met someone who believed in tongues, but you felt was more focused on emotion, exultation of self, or proof that they had the Holy Spirit? Share your thoughts.
d. Case Study : One of your relatives states: “Is your church more focused on outreach and evangelism or are they more inwardly focused? How are the church funds spent?” How would you respond to your relative?

2. Have a volunteer read Acts 10:1-4.

a. Ask class members to share a short thought on what the most important point is in this passage.
b. How do you think Cornelius, a non-Jew, came to be a devout man who feared God?
c. Personal Application : Have you ever had an experience where God has sent someone to you or to your church so that you could witness to them?” Share your thoughts.
d. Case Study : One of your friends states, “I think this is an example of not running ahead of the Lord. Peter was right to wait for God to have people come to him. We try to reach out, but the people aren’t ready for the gospel. We should wait and pray and God will send people to us who are searching for truth.” How would you respond to your neighbor?

3. Have a volunteer read Acts 10:17.

a. Ask class members to share a short thought on what the main idea of this text is.
b. Does God speak to His servants today in visions and dreams, or is that a thing of the past?
c. Personal Application: Has God ever given you a vision or dream that you weren’t sure what the meaning was? How can we be sure it’s from God and not Satanic or pickles and ice cream? Share your thoughts..
d. Case Study : One of your neighbors states, “Doesn’t this text show that it doesn’t matter what goes in the mouth, but what comes out? Isn’t it okay to eat whatever we pray over and God will bless it?” How would you respond to your friend?

4. Have a volunteer read Acts 15:19-21.

a. Ask class members to share a short thought on what the main idea of this text is.
b. Why is there a restriction here on things strangled, blood, and food offered to idols? Is this a cultural restriction, or does it apply to us today?
c. Personal Application: How do we “trouble” those who are coming into the church? How can we guide and teach without being judgmental? Share your thoughts.
d. Case Study : Think of one person who needs to hear a message from this week’s lesson. Tell the class what you plan to do this week to share with them.

(Note : “Truth that is not lived, that is not imparted, loses its life-giving power, its healing virtue. Its blessings can be retained only as it is shared.” Ministry of Healing, p. 148)

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2 comment(s) for this post:

  1. Jason Schellas:
    28 Aug 2015 Thank you, I am teaching this weeks lesson and your comments helped me put together a better lesson than I had hoped for. some of your questions lead me to review a lot of the lesson I was having trouble with.Thanks once again Blessings in your life. Jason
  2. Emilio Januario Xerinda:
    28 Aug 2015 I am a Mozambican Adventist.Ssnet is the only source I can rely on since there are no English quarterly facilities here.It helps me a lot. In fact,apart from learning the word of God,ssnet helps me improve my English on a daily basis. God may enlight you even more so that many lives can be changed across the world.Thank you!

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