Sunday: Paul’s Own Hand
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By Paul's Own Hand

Compare Paul’s closing remarks in Galatians 6:11-18 to the final remarks he makes in his other letters. In what way is the ending of Galatians similar to and different from them? (See the final remarks in Romans, 1 and 2 Corinthians, Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, and 1 and 2 Thessalonians.) Paul’s closing remarks are not always uniform, but a … [Click to read more …]

Thursday: Sowing and Reaping
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Sowing and Reaping

(Gal. 6:6-10) In Galatians 6:7, the word translated “mocked” (mukterizo) occurs only here in the New Testament, though it often appears in the Greek translation of the Old Testament. It literally means “to turn up one’s nose in contempt.” In the Old Testament it typically refers to the despising of God’s prophets (2 Chron. 36:16, Jer. 20:7), and … [Click to read more …]

Wednesday: The Law of Christ
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Sermon on the Mount

(Gal. 6:2-5) Paul connects burden bearing with fulfilling the law of Christ. What does he mean by “the law of Christ”? Gal. 5:14, Gal. 6:2, John 13:34, Matt. 22:34-40. Paul’s use of the phrase “the law of Christ” (ton nomon tou Christou) occurs nowhere else in the Bible, though he uses a similar expression in 1 Corinthians 9:21 (ennomos Christou). The uniqueness of this … [Click to read more …]

Singing with Inspiration – Lesson 13: The Gospel and the Church
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Sabbath Afternoon’s introduction story to the lesson study immediately gives us: Hymn 369, “Bringing in the Sheaves” with the thoughts finalising in: “the Spirit leads us to put others before ourselves” and Hymn 262, “Sweet, Sweet Spirit”. The end of Sunday’s study points us to: Hymn 367, “Rescue the Perishing”. If you are blessed to … [Click to read more …]

Tuesday: Burden Bearing
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Sharing Burdens

(Gal. 6:2-5) In addition to restoring the fallen, what other instructions does Paul give to the believers in Galatia? (Gal. 6:2-5; see also Rom. 15:1, Matt. 7:12). The Greek word translated “burden” in Galatians 6:2 is baros. It literally referred to a heavy weight or load that someone had to carry a long distance. Over time, however, it became a metaphor … [Click to read more …]