Tuesday: Made of One Blood
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In Genesis 2:23, Adam is given the task of naming his wife, whom he

Image © Jeff Preston from GoodSalt.com

Image © Jeff Preston from GoodSalt.com

called Havah. This word is related to the Hebrew verb hayah, which means “to live” (Jews sometimes use the related expression lehayim, “to life!”). The Hebrew word for “Eve” (Havah) can be translated as “life-giver.” Eve’s name represents the fact that she is the ancestor of all humans. We are all one family in the most literal sense.

Read Acts 17:26. How does Paul link the brotherhood of all humanity to the creation? Compare with Matt. 23:9.

We are united in that we all descended from one woman, Eve, and from one man, Adam. And God is the Father of us all. This fact is the basis of human equality. Think how different human relations would be if all people recognized this important truth. If we ever needed proof of how far fallen we are, of how badly sin has damaged us, we have it in the sad fact that humans often treat each other worse than some people treat animals.

Read Proverbs 14:31 and 22:2. How do these texts help us to understand the link between morality and the fact that we are created by God?

Many factors have divided the human race: political, national, ethnic, and, of course, economic. The economic factor is, arguably, one of the most consequential (though never to the degree that Karl Marx envisioned: the workers of the world never did unite; instead, they warred against each other based on their nationality). Today, as always, the poor and the rich often regard one another with suspicion and disdain. How often these sentiments have led to violence, even war. The causes of poverty and the solution to it still continue to baffle us (see Matt. 26:11), but one thing is sure from the Word of God: rich or poor, we all deserve the dignity that is ours by virtue of our origins.

Years ago, after Darwinism became fashionable, some justified the exploitation of the poor by the rich on the grounds of “social Darwinism,” the idea that because, in the natural world, the strong overcome and exploit the weak, why should not the same principle apply in economics? How is this another example of why a correct grasp of origins is crucial to the understanding of morality?

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