HomeFeatureUnity as Music    

Comments

Unity as Music — 3 Comments

  1. Good morning Stephen Terry, at least from where I live. I like your use of music to teach about relationships within the church and I agree with what you say.

    The only thing that I think needs commenting on is your use of Matt 11:16-17. You of course are taking this text out of context. In this incidence I am not objecting to your doing that because your whole article is in the form of a parable and as such you have the legitimate right to use that text the way you did.

    What I would like to point out is that if we use that text within context it gives us yet another valuable lesson we need to learn about music. There was nothing wrong with what the musicians were playing because the musicians were John the Baptist and Jesus Himself (vss 18-19). The problem was with the hearers. They didn’t like anything that was being played and therefore rejected everything.

    The lesson for us is that if we are to be good communicators we first must be good listeners. There are those who are so wrapped up in themselves who feel they have the perfect song and proceed to bellow it out without first taking notice as to what the rest of the orchestra is playing. Even though they honestly feel their music is full of beauty it only becomes “sounding brass or a clanging cymbal” (I speak from experience).

    Furthermore, if we don’t first listen then we will never know what another member of the body is playing and will never make an attempt to understand why.

    Amen!(0)
    • Thanks for your comment, Tyler. It seems to me that the ones playing the music in Matthew 11 were the "children of this generation." That would not be John the Baptist or Jesus.

      I believe the point I made still holds that they were upset that no matter what Jesus or John the Baptist did they claimed the two were not dancing to the proper tune. They played but did not understand what the music really said about Christ or John.

      Amen!(0)

Please leave a comment long enough to say something significant and considerably shorter than the original post. First and last name required.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Please leave a comment long enough to say something significant and preferably significantly shorter than the post on which you are commenting.

HTML tags allowed in your comment: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>